United Benefit Advisors Insight and Analysis Blog

How to Complete the IRS/SSA/CMS Data Match Report

Posted by: Danielle Capilla    Jul 26, 2016 10:30:00 AM

Data Match is a program coordinated by the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), and the Social Security Administration (SSA) to identify Medicare beneficiaries who received Medicare benefits with Medicare as the primary payer when Medicare should have been the secondary payer. We recently covered background on this program in a previous blog posting. Employers are required to complete the Data Match report within 30 days of receipt of the Data Match Personal Identification Number (PIN), unless an extension has been requested and approved. The letter directs employers to the Data Match Secure Website, where the questionnaire can be accessed after entering the employer identification number and PIN.

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Topics: compliance, Medicare, Danielle Capilla, IRS-SSA-CMS Data Match Program

Top 10 UBA Blogs from 2015 Reveal Hot Button Healthcare Issues for Employers

Posted by: Bill Olson    Jan 7, 2016 12:00:00 PM

  1. IRS Provides Details on Reimbursing Premiums for Individual Health Coverage or Medicare Part B, Part D, for Medigap for Active Employees. For many years, employers were permitted to reimburse premiums paid for individual coverage on a tax-favored basis, however, these "employer payment plans" frequently are unable to meet all of the PPACA requirements. Read more
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Topics: wellness, ACA, PPACA, IRS Reporting Rules, summary of benefits and coverage, Cadillac Tax, PPACA reporting, Medicare, UBA Health Plan Survey, Affordable Care Act

Medicare Costs Explained

Posted by: Kathy Binkley, RHU, ChHC    Aug 25, 2015 12:00:00 PM

I’m sure you’ve heard the phrase “Nothing in life is free,” and nothing is – not even Medicare. In most cases, you won’t have to pay a premium to get Medicare, at least for Part A (here’s a refresher on the different parts of Medicare), but that doesn’t mean it’s free. You’ve just pre-paid in the form of taxes. So you don’t have to worry about a premium for Part A, which covers in-patient hospital expenses, assuming you or your spouse paid Social Security for at least 10 years. However, there are other costs associated with Medicare, which vary depending on the specific insurance.

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Topics: health care costs, health care reform, The Wilson Agency, retirement savings, Medigap, Medicare, Medicare secondary payer, Kathy Binkley

Top 5 Questions about Medicare Secondary Payer Rules

Posted by: Danielle Capilla    Apr 28, 2015 12:00:00 PM

Under federal regulations, Medicare is a secondary payer for many individuals who have an employer group health plan available to them, either as an employee or the dependent spouse or child of the employee. Generally the Medicare Secondary Payer rules prohibit employers with more than 20 employees from in any way incentivizing an active employee age 65 or older to elect Medicare instead of the group health plan, which includes offering a financial incentive. Although premium payment arrangement rules under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) provide a limited circumstance for reimbursing Medicare premiums, this option is not feasible for employers with more than 20 employees due to Medicare Secondary Payer rules.

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Topics: PPACA Affordable Care Act, Group health plans, Medicare, Medicare secondary payer

SCOTUS and the Future of U.S. Health Care

Posted by: Peter Freska    Apr 14, 2015 12:00:00 PM

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA), commonly referred to as “Obamacare,” was signed into law with the intention of decreasing the number of uninsured Americans and reducing the overall costs of health care in the United States. In order to increase the number of U.S. citizens covered, a number of mechanisms including mandates, subsidies, and tax credits became effective beginning January 1, 2014. The federal health care law also contains many reforms aimed at improving health care outcomes and streamlining the delivery of care. While this reform may be appealing, there are many concerns as to its viability, beginning with the increased number of people covered to effective reduction of health care costs. In the latest arguments for or against PPACA, the Supreme Court of the United States (SCOTUS) heard arguments on the legality of who is able to provide subsidies to those who qualify for subsidies. This lawsuit contends that subsidies are illegal unless a state has set up its own health insurance exchange. The charge is based on wording in the law, which states that subsidies are for health coverage obtained on an “Exchange established by the State under section 1311.”

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Topics: health care reform, premium subsidies, Medicaid, PPACA Affordable Care Act, U.S. Supreme Court, Medicare, single-payer system, Obamacare